Predictive validity of explicit and implicit self-esteem for subjective well-being


Citation:

Schimmack, U., & Diener, E. (2003). Predictive validity of explicit and implicit self-esteem for subjective well-being. Journal of Research in Personality, 37(2), 100-106.


Abstract:

In recent years, researchers have developed a variety of techniques to measure implicit self-esteem. Bosson, Swann, and Pennebaker examined the reliability and validity of these measures. Only some implicit measures were reliable, and even these measures failed to show convergent and predictive validity. In contrast, explicit self-esteem predicted subjective well-being (SWB). However, the predictive validity of explicit self-esteem measures may have been inflated because SWB was assessed by means of self-reports. The present article addresses this concern. We correlated self-reports and informant reports of subjective well-being with an explicit (Rosenberg’s self-esteem scale) and an implicit measure of self-esteem (preferences for initials). Explicit self-esteem was a significant predictor of all SWB measures. Preferences for initials were not significantly correlated with any of the SWB measures.


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