Effects of voluntary and semivoluntary peer-monitoring programs on academic performance


Citation:

Beaman, A. L., Diener, E., Fraser, S. C., & Endresen, K. L. (1977). Effects of voluntary and semivoluntary peer-monitoring programs on academic performance. Journal of Educational Psychology, 69(2), 109-114.


Abstract:

Three studies involving a total of 302 undergraduates examined the effects of variations of peer-monitoring procedures on academic performance of college students. The variations included voluntary course "requirements," minimal mutual study time, and voluntary grade averaging. Mutual study groups performed at higher levels than control groups but averaged no more total time studying than controls. Varying methods of alleviating student concerns about the approach and of implementing the innovations to benefit the maximum number of students were investigated. It appears that although students can do well with the methods, participation is unlikely without the use of grade contingencies. 


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